1. The stories we tell about our lives are not necessarily those lives as they were lived, but these stories become our experience of those lives. A published narrative of an illness is not the illness itself, but it can become the experience of the illness. The social scientific notion of reliability—getting the same answer to the same question at different times—does not fit here. Life moves on, stories change with that movement, and experience changes. Stories are true to the flux of experience, and the story affects the direction of that flux.
    — Arthur Frank, The Wounded Storyteller, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1995. p 22. 
     
  2. All the stupidity and the arbitrariness of the laws, all the pain of the initiations, the whole perverse apparatus of repression and education, the red-hot irons, and the atrocious procedures have only this meaning: to discipline man, to mark him in his flesh, to render him capable of alliance, to form him within the debtor-creditor relation, which on both sides turns out to be a matter of memory - a memory straining toward the future
    — Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari, Anti-Oedipus p. 207-208 (via post-makhno)
     
  3. Smith’s overarching point was this: taxes were bad only when they undermined the productive use of capital. But taxation should be used to discourage unproductive economic activities. Landlords, for instance, charged tenants large fines for lease renewals, rather than raise the monthly rent. This is usually “the expedient of a spend-thrift, who for a sum of ready money sells a future revenue of much greater value.” It is “hurtful to the landlord,” frequently to the tenant, but always to the community. So it should be taxed at a higher rate. A tax upon house–rents would also “in general fall heaviest upon the rich,” a welcome outcome, since rent was an unproductive expense; when high, it was simply a luxury. And when Smith advocated against a tax, it was for pragmatic reasons, as with taxing capital: capital holdings could never be verified and could always flee the country, so taxing them was counter-productive. But ground-rents should be taxable, as “Nothing can be more reasonable than that a fund which owes its existence to the good government of the state” should be taxed more than in proportion to its benefit.

    So who was to blame for bad taxes and bad policies? Smith reveled in showing how “those who live by profit,” namely the merchants and manufacturers, the dealers and bankers, habitually mislead the public, often by imposing higher taxes on the workers—foolishly not realizing that ultimately they would bear the real cost. They were also responsible for convincing gullible parliaments that high wages were bad. Legislators should always beware of the sophistries of employers, who, for instance, blame rising wages, yet “say nothing concerning the bad effects of high profits. They are silent with regard to the pernicious effects of their own gains. They complain only of those of other people.”

    Much like many progressive critics of current inequality, like Stiglitz, Krugman, Hacker and Pierson and others, Smith targets rentier practices by the rich and powerful as distorting economic outcomes. And although he strongly criticizes some regulation, I show that it is regulation favoring the rich and powerful that he attacks. The concern with the welfare of the laboring poor is palpable throughout the book. As is the awareness of “the insolent outrage of furious and disappointed monopolists” that endangers anyone willing to thwart them. Progressive concerns are therefore neither a departure nor a distortion of the original classical liberal vision and nor is the latter conservative: in fact, Smith encourages us to ask even more forcefully why inequality is accepted as inevitable, not out of concern with equality, but to secure the economic growth of nations, not just groups.

     
  4. image: Download

    
"Here in the United States, our high level of income inequality corresponds with 883, 914 unnecessary deaths each year… Put that into perspective. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), tobacco, including second-hand smoke, causes approximately 480,000 deaths every year, and in 2010, traffic accidents killed 33,687 people and 31,672 others died of gunshot wounds.
The mechanism by which a bullet or a car crash kills is readily apparent. Inequality is lethal in ways that are less obvious. It’s a silent killer – a deadly plague that we, as a society, tend not to acknowledge.”
— High Inequality Results in More US Deaths than Tobacco, Car Crashes and Guns Combined | Moyers & Co. (British Medical Journal Study)

    "Here in the United States, our high level of income inequality corresponds with 883, 914 unnecessary deaths each year… Put that into perspective. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), tobacco, including second-hand smoke, causes approximately 480,000 deaths every year, and in 2010, traffic accidents killed 33,687 people and 31,672 others died of gunshot wounds.

    The mechanism by which a bullet or a car crash kills is readily apparent. Inequality is lethal in ways that are less obvious. It’s a silent killer – a deadly plague that we, as a society, tend not to acknowledge.”

    — High Inequality Results in More US Deaths than Tobacco, Car Crashes and Guns Combined | Moyers & Co. (British Medical Journal Study)

    (Source: america-wakiewakie)

     
  5. We must cease once and for all to describe the effects of power in negative terms […] In fact, power produces; it produces reality; it produces domains of objects and rituals of truth. The individual and the knowledge that may be gained of him belong to this production.
    — Michel Foucault, Discipline and Punish (via insertpropagandahere)
     
  6. thenearsightedmonkey:

    Dear Students,

    After the time has come for us to part and you are feeling as tore up as I am, please feel free to write four different X page stories about these four photos over four days somewhere in the future.

    Remember….You are either in this photo or this is something you are seeing.

    And even if you don’t write a word of it, remember how even silently asking the questions will help you see what is there, something may hop out at you, something you might have otherwise missed if you hadn’t asked “Where’s the light coming from? And what kind of light is it?”

    And EXTRA CREDIT! don’t forget what happens to seeing when you use drawing as a way to really look.

    Sincerely

    La Professora Chewbaccacita

    vintageeveryday:

    Streets of the USA in 1956.

    I probably won’t actually do it in this lifetime, but I’d love to take one of Lynda Barry’s drawing and writing classes. She’s so serious and so playful; so demanding and so permissive. From the outside looking in, she seems to embody good teaching.

    (Source: vintag.es)

     
  7. As anyone alert and awake knows, the Managed Care system in place has relegated psychiatrists to the role of medication doctors focusing on symptoms. That has been true for some time, and psychiatry, particularly APA psychiatry, has essentially become a psychopharmacology specialty with what many of us consider an outrageous expansion in drug treatment. Let me remind you of the SAMHSA report I posted recently [a graph…]:

    … My concern in both the SPMI and the Collaborative Care models Lieberman is proposing is that the legacy of the Age of Psychopharmacology will be directly incorporated into both arms of the Lieberman System and perhaps even expand. This kind of medical model thinking for psychiatry is the stuff of managed care, perhaps its only stuff, and I’m reading the model as pure managed care… .

     
  8. "[C]onsider Audre Lorde’s Cancer Journals … I take 1980 to mark the emergence of a new figure—the politicized patient—and a new genre—the patient’s counternarrative to medical discourse as exemplified by doctor’s charts and case histories. Since 1980 we have seen the proliferation of both activism around health issues as well as personal writings about the experience of illness from the patient’s perspective, and I consider Lorde as an exemplary writer-activist who transformed the silence surrounding breast cancer through language and action.”
- Lisa Diedrich, Treatments: Language, politics, and the culture of illness. p 26.

    "[C]onsider Audre Lorde’s Cancer Journals … I take 1980 to mark the emergence of a new figure—the politicized patient—and a new genre—the patient’s counternarrative to medical discourse as exemplified by doctor’s charts and case histories. Since 1980 we have seen the proliferation of both activism around health issues as well as personal writings about the experience of illness from the patient’s perspective, and I consider Lorde as an exemplary writer-activist who transformed the silence surrounding breast cancer through language and action.”

    - Lisa Diedrich, Treatments: Language, politics, and the culture of illness. p 26.

     
  9. 14:06 21st Apr 2014

    Notes: 11

    Reblogged from cultureofresistance

    sustainableprosperity:

    "We Won’t Succumb to Threats": Journalists Return to U.S. For First Time Since Revealing NSA Spying

    Published on Apr 14, 2014

    http://www.democracynow.org - Ten months ago, Laura Poitras and Glenn Greenwald flew from New York to Hong Kong to meet National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden. Poitras and Greenwald did not return to the United States until this past Friday when they flew from Berlin to New York to accept the George Polk Award for National Security Reporting. They arrived not knowing if they would be detained or subpoenaed after Director of National Intelligence James Clapper described journalists working on the NSA story as Snowden’s “accomplices.” At a news conference following the George Polk Award ceremony, Poitras and Greenwald took questions from reporters about their reporting and the government intimidation it has sparked. 

    Watch: All Democracy Now! interviews with Glenn Greenwald & Laura Poitras
    http://www.democracynow.org/topics/ed…

    Democracy Now!, is an independent global news hour that airs weekdays on 1,200+ TV and radio stations Monday through Friday. Watch our livestream 8-9am ET at http://www.democracynow.org.
    Please consider supporting independent media by making a donation to Democracy Now! today, visit http://owl.li/ruJ5Q.




    FOLLOW DEMOCRACY NOW! ONLINE:
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  10. 07:37

    Notes: 597

    Reblogged from rafaelfajardo

    Several months ago, I was at a school event where a very young black girl was standing shyly off to the side as I was chatting with some 6th grade students after my presentation. She gave me her notebook and asked me to sign it, which I was glad to do. It was a book of her own poetry and short stories. I smiled and said “I’m so glad to meet a young writer!” She beamed at me and said “I love writing and I want to be a writer but I didn’t think I could because I’m not white.” I was surprised and asked her if she’d read any books by Walter Dean Myers, Angela Johnson, or Linda Sue Park. She nodded and shrugged her shoulder and said, “But I’ve never seen them in person.” To this young teen, an author of color was a mythical creature, not to be believed, until she’d seen one in person. She couldn’t believe in her dream to become a writer until she saw for herself that a real life POC had done it. This is why we must continue to fight for diversity in children’s literature. For all of our children, so that they can see that we exist and that they can believe that their dreams of becoming whatever they want, can come true.
    — 

    From this great post by Ellen Oh.

    This story reminds me, too, of something I always talk about which was that I never met an author until I was like 25. Until then, I didn’t think I could be one because I thought being an author was for special rich people who lived far away, probably in New York, and had some secret access to that whole world. (This was before the internet.) So I can totally imagine how a non-white kid who only ever met white authors would think the way the girl in this story does.

    Adults are models of possibility. We need to model all sorts of possibility for all sorts of kids, and can’t ever assume that they just “know” about things existing that they don’t get to see and experience for themselves.

    Especially when you’re a poor kid or otherwise not privileged in some way or come from an addicted family, you tend to have people around you that have those same limited and limiting beliefs. I never had goals or ambitions modeled for me by the adults in my immediate family. No one ever said I could and should try things that I wanted to do and have dreams and take risks. I learned survival and getting by, and making do with what you have and staying safe. I was a poor kid, and got that. When I multiply my own experience by a factor of also not-white, I can start to catch a tiny glimpse of what the girl in Ellen’s story and kids like her are up against.

    I can stand in front of kids and talk about my background of poverty, and the dysfunction I grew up in, and I do do that, to share my own struggle to achieve a goal. But when I’m talking to a roomful of not-white kids (and I’ve been to plenty of schools like that) I know it’s not the same as if they could see someone who looks like them telling that story. Thanks, Ellen, for sharing this.

    (via sarazarr)

    I didn’t believe that I could be a writer until I learned that SE Hinton was 1. a woman and 2. from Oklahoma just like me. I was born and raised on a farm. I went to a small school in a very rural area. Like a lot of people, I thought writers were mystical creatures (and dead Europeans). Learning THE OUTSIDERS was written by someone more similar to me than different changed the course of my life.

    It is SO important for young people with dreams to know that people who resemble them (in all ways…race, gender, socioeconomic status—everything!) have achieved the same dreams.

    So dream. Share. Repeat.

    -Ally

    (via theallycarter)

     
  11. Even an experience is not, and never is, perceived in its completeness, it cannot be grasped adequately in its full unity. It is essentially something that flows, starting from the present moment we can swim after it, our gaze reflectively turned towards it, whilst the stretches we leave in our wake are lost to our perception.
    — Edmund Husserl  (via tiredshoes)

    (Source: joecoulter)

     
  12. To commit to love is fundamentally to commit to a life beyond dualism. That’s why love is so sacred in a culture of domination, because it simply begins to erode your dualisms: dualisms of black and white, male and female, right and wrong.
    — 

    bell hooks, “Agent of Change

    (via tricycle-tumbles)

     
  13. 08:26 20th Apr 2014

    Notes: 11218

    Reblogged from cultureofresistance

    image: Download

    anarcho-queer:

Women Prisoners Sterilized To Cut Welfare Cost In California
In California, prison doctors have sterilized at least 148 women, mainly Mexicans, from 2006 to 2010. Why? They don’t want to have to provide welfare funding for any children they may have in the future and to eliminate ‘defectives’ from the gene pool.
The sterilization procedures cost California taxpayers $147,460 between 1997 and 2010. The doctors at the prison argue it is money well-spent.
Dr. James Heinrich, an OB-GYN at Valley State Prison for Women, said, “Over a 10-year period, that isn’t a huge amount of money compared to what you save in welfare paying for these unwanted children – as they procreated more.”
In 1909, California passed the country’s third sterilization law, authorizing reproductive surgeries of patients committed to state institutions for the “feebleminded” and “insane” that were deemed suffering from a “mental disease which may have been inherited and is likely to be transmitted to descendants.” Based on this eugenic logic, 20,000 patients in more than ten institutions were sterilized in California from 1909 to 1979. Worried about charges of “cruel and unusual punishment,” legislators attached significant provisions to sterilization in state prisons. Despite these restrictions, about 600 men received vasectomies at San Quentin in the 1930s when the superintendent flaunted the law.
Moreover, there was a discernible racial bias in the state’s sterilization and eugenics programs. Preliminary research on a subset of 15,000 sterilization orders in institutions (conducted by Stern and Natalie Lira) suggests that Spanish-surnamed patients, predominantly of Mexican origin, were sterilized at rates ranging from 20 to 30 percent from 1922 to 1952, far surpassing their proportion of the general population.
In her recent book, Miroslava Chávez-García shows, through exhaustively researched stories of youth of color who were institutionalized in state reformatories, and sometimes subsequently sterilized, how eugenic racism harmed California’s youngest generation in patterns all too reminiscent of detention and incarceration today. California was the most zealous sterilizer, carrying out one-third of the approximately 60,000 operations performed in the 32 states that passed eugenic sterilization laws from 1907 to 1937.
Although such procedures may seem harsh, they are not illegal. The Supreme Court ruled in 1927 that women can be forcibly sterilized in jail in Buck vs Bell. Writing for the majority, Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. said, “Three generations of imbeciles are enough.”
Credit

    anarcho-queer:

    Women Prisoners Sterilized To Cut Welfare Cost In California

    In California, prison doctors have sterilized at least 148 women, mainly Mexicans, from 2006 to 2010. Why? They don’t want to have to provide welfare funding for any children they may have in the future and to eliminate ‘defectives’ from the gene pool.

    The sterilization procedures cost California taxpayers $147,460 between 1997 and 2010. The doctors at the prison argue it is money well-spent.

    Dr. James Heinrich, an OB-GYN at Valley State Prison for Women, said, “Over a 10-year period, that isn’t a huge amount of money compared to what you save in welfare paying for these unwanted children – as they procreated more.

    In 1909, California passed the country’s third sterilization law, authorizing reproductive surgeries of patients committed to state institutions for the “feebleminded” and “insane” that were deemed suffering from a “mental disease which may have been inherited and is likely to be transmitted to descendants.” Based on this eugenic logic, 20,000 patients in more than ten institutions were sterilized in California from 1909 to 1979. Worried about charges of “cruel and unusual punishment,” legislators attached significant provisions to sterilization in state prisons. Despite these restrictions, about 600 men received vasectomies at San Quentin in the 1930s when the superintendent flaunted the law.

    Moreover, there was a discernible racial bias in the state’s sterilization and eugenics programs. Preliminary research on a subset of 15,000 sterilization orders in institutions (conducted by Stern and Natalie Lira) suggests that Spanish-surnamed patients, predominantly of Mexican origin, were sterilized at rates ranging from 20 to 30 percent from 1922 to 1952, far surpassing their proportion of the general population.

    In her recent book, Miroslava Chávez-García shows, through exhaustively researched stories of youth of color who were institutionalized in state reformatories, and sometimes subsequently sterilized, how eugenic racism harmed California’s youngest generation in patterns all too reminiscent of detention and incarceration today.

    California was the most zealous sterilizer, carrying out one-third of the approximately 60,000 operations performed in the 32 states that passed eugenic sterilization laws from 1907 to 1937.

    Although such procedures may seem harsh, they are not illegal. The Supreme Court ruled in 1927 that women can be forcibly sterilized in jail in Buck vs Bell. Writing for the majority, Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. said, “Three generations of imbeciles are enough.

    Credit

     
  14. I think you don’t give up hope on these things. We have— look at the American political tradition. Look at the— one of the interesting things that Piketty says is that serious progressive taxation of high incomes and great wealth is an American invention. We invented it, and we invented it in the early 20th century, right at the peak of our Gilded Age. And somehow we found it in ourselves to turn— to find political leaders, people like Teddy Roosevelt, who are willing to say, “This is a bad thing, we do not want the society that is emerging here.” So I think things can change. What— if you ask, you know, are we going to get a wealth tax, a global wealth tax before the 2016 election? Well no, we’re not. Might we get one by the 2024 election? Possibly.
    — Paul Krugman (via azspot)
     
  15. image: Download

    "According to Frank, the modern experience of illness is substantively different from the postmodern experience of illness. Frank identifies Talcott Parsons as the preeminent theorist of the modern experience of illness, an experience characterized by the patient’s assumption of what Parsons identified as the ‘sick role,’ which required an absolute surrender to the care of a physician and the institutional structures of medicine. Partly because  of the shift in the twentieth century from acute to chronic illnesses (thanks, of course, in no small part to the successes of modern medicine), the experience of illness has shifted as well. Formerly patients generally either got better or died; now, however, patients are often neither fully cured of nor dead from their illnesses, but, rather are in and out of remission. The body remains haunted by illness and its threat; the person is neither fully healthy nor precisely ill; they are somewhere in between. Frank maintains that in postmodern times there are many people, including himself, who occupy this liminal position between health and illness: thus, in the late-twentieth-century West, we live in what Frank calls a ‘remission society.’ In a ‘remission society’ the boundaries between health and illness are permanently disrupted, thereby challenging the dichotomous formulation of health as the norm and illness as that which deviates from the norm.”
- Lisa Diedrich, Treatments: Language, politics, and the culture of illness. p 3

    "According to Frank, the modern experience of illness is substantively different from the postmodern experience of illness. Frank identifies Talcott Parsons as the preeminent theorist of the modern experience of illness, an experience characterized by the patient’s assumption of what Parsons identified as the ‘sick role,’ which required an absolute surrender to the care of a physician and the institutional structures of medicine. Partly because  of the shift in the twentieth century from acute to chronic illnesses (thanks, of course, in no small part to the successes of modern medicine), the experience of illness has shifted as well. Formerly patients generally either got better or died; now, however, patients are often neither fully cured of nor dead from their illnesses, but, rather are in and out of remission. The body remains haunted by illness and its threat; the person is neither fully healthy nor precisely ill; they are somewhere in between. Frank maintains that in postmodern times there are many people, including himself, who occupy this liminal position between health and illness: thus, in the late-twentieth-century West, we live in what Frank calls a ‘remission society.’ In a ‘remission society’ the boundaries between health and illness are permanently disrupted, thereby challenging the dichotomous formulation of health as the norm and illness as that which deviates from the norm.”

    - Lisa Diedrich, Treatments: Language, politics, and the culture of illness. p 3