1. 04:22 31st Jul 2014

    Notes: 511

    Reblogged from cultureofresistance

    thepeoplesrecord:

The Pentagon has approved a deal to supply 6,900 precision bomb kits to replenish Israel’s weapons stockpiles, diminished by the recent war against Hamas in Gaza. The contract is valued at $647 million.
“The United States is committed to the security of Israel, and it is vital to U.S. national interests to assist Israel to develop and maintain a strong and ready self-defense capability,” the Pentagon said in a statement. 

    thepeoplesrecord:

    The Pentagon has approved a deal to supply 6,900 precision bomb kits to replenish Israel’s weapons stockpiles, diminished by the recent war against Hamas in Gaza. The contract is valued at $647 million.

    “The United States is committed to the security of Israel, and it is vital to U.S. national interests to assist Israel to develop and maintain a strong and ready self-defense capability,” the Pentagon said in a statement. 

     
  2. 22:36 30th Jul 2014

    Notes: 15

    Reblogged from afsc-org

    afsc-org:

    Photos from Gaza, before the siege. 

    (More about the history of our work in Gaza and more at afsc.org/gaza)

     
  3. 22:33

    Notes: 5

    Reblogged from circlingtheroundabout

    circlingtheroundabout:

    Three weeks of war between Israel and Palestinian militants in Gaza have pushed the territory to the brink of humanitarian disaster. Israel’s military on Tuesday broadened its offensive, bombing 150 sites, and one strike set ablaze the territory’s only power plant, filling the sky with smoke and cutting the electricity needed to pump water and sewage systems as well.

    As the Palestinian death toll has risen to more than 1,220, including about 300 children, 22 medical facilities have been damaged and 215,000 people have fled their homes.

    The longer the war lasts, the worse it gets.

    This was already out of control, but now we are bordering on the pathological. Who among the dipshits on the Israeli side have any inkling of a belief that increasing the suffering plaguing these people will somehow make the war end? Who is sitting in those military briefings with Bibi saying, “Boy I know what will really work: let’s bomb the power plant so they can’t even get drinking water! That’ll show ‘em.”

    Something about this time feels different, like neither side is going to simply agree to a cease fire. Something about this time feels like either Gaza and the majority of its population will cease to exist (a depressing possibility now that Israel has proven it couldn’t care less about destroying every inch of this territory) or the worldwide backlash to Israeli tactics will increase enough to make them stop. But one of these two things is certain to happen if this collective punishment continues unabated.

     
  4. 22:25

    Notes: 57

    Reblogged from cultureofresistance

    fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

    Chuck D, Angela Davis, Roger Waters & Others Show their Support for Palestine in New Video

    Freedom4Palestine.org released a new video co-sponsored by Jewish Voices for Peace featuring, artist, authors, actors and activists showing their support for Palestine.

    The video features Chuck D, Angela Davis, Roger Waters, Naomi Klein, Desmond Tutu, Wallace Shawn, Palestinian hip hip group DAM and many more.

    Many hold up the names of Palestinians killed in the Israeli bombing of the Gaza Strip in what is called the #GazaNames project.

     
  5. 22:25

    Notes: 42

    Reblogged from azspot

    OVER the past 40 years, the geography of family life has been destabilized by two powerful forces pulling in opposite directions and occasionally scraping against each other, much like tectonic plates. One is the striking progress toward equality between men and women. The other is the equally striking growth of socioeconomic inequality and insecurity. Since the 1970s, families have become more egalitarian in their internal relationships. But inequality among families has soared. Women have become more secure as their real wages and legal rights have increased. But families have become more insecure as their income and job instability have worsened.
     
  6. 22:22

    Notes: 84

    Reblogged from thenearsightedmonkey

    image: Download

    thenearsightedmonkey:



'World stands disgraced' as Israeli shelling of school kills at least 15
• UN condemns IDF attack on sleeping children as violation of international law• Strike on crowded market in Shujai’iya during ceasefire kills 17 • Death toll now more than 1,300 after three weeks of fighting



Harriet Sherwood in Jerusalem and Hazem Balousha in Jabaliya

The Guardian, Wednesday 30 July 2014 14.37 EDT


 Link to video: Gaza: nothing more shameful than attacking sleeping children, says Ban Ki-moon  
United Nations officials described the killing of sleeping children as a disgrace to the world and accused Israel of a serious violation of international law after a school in Gaza being used to shelter Palestinian families was shelled on Wednesday.
At least 15 people, mostly children and women, died when the school in Jabaliya refugee camp was hit by five shells during a night of relentless bombardment across Gaza. More than 100 people were injured.
Ban Ki-moon, the UN secretary general, said the attack was “outrageous and unjustifiable” and demanded “accountability and justice”. The UN said its officials had repeatedly given details of the school and its refugee population to Israel.
  A Palestinian girl cries while receiving treatment for her injuries caused by an Israeli strike. Photograph: Khalil Hamra/AP  
Fighting in Gaza continued through the day despite a four-hour humanitarian ceasefire called by Israel from 3pm. A crowded market in Shujai’iya was hit in the late afternoon, causing at least 17 deaths, including a journalist, and injuring about 200 people, according to Gaza health officials. They said people had ventured out to shop in the belief a ceasefire was in place. Witnesses said several shells struck as people were running away. Israel said rockets and mortar shells continued to be fired from Gaza.
At the UN school the first shell came just after the early morning call to prayer, when most of those taking shelter were asleep, crammed into classrooms with what few possessions they had managed to snatch as they fled their homes.
About 3,300 people had squashed into Jabaliya Elementary A&B Girls’ School since the Israeli military warned people to leave their homes and neighbourhoods or risk death under intense bombardment. Classroom number one, near the school’s entrance, had become home to about 40 people, mostly women and children.
As a shell blasted through the wall, showering occupants with shrapnel and spattering blood on walls and floors, Amna Zantit, 31, scrambled to gather up her three terrified infants in a panicked bid for the relative safety of the schoolyard. “Everyone was trying to escape,” she said, clutching her eight-month old baby tightly. Minutes later, a second shell slammed through the roof of the two-storey school. At least 15 people were killed and more than 100 injured. Most were women or children.
Pierre Krähenbühl, commissioner-general of the UN agency for Palestinian refugees, UNRWA, said the shelling of the school was a “serious violation of international law by Israeli forces”.
Krähenbühl said: “Last night, children were killed as they slept next to their parents on the floor of a classroom in a UN-designated shelter in Gaza. Children killed in their sleep; this is an affront to all of us, a source of universal shame. Today the world stands disgraced.”
Khalil al-Halabi, the UN official in charge of the schools in the area, was quickly on the scene. Bodies were littered over the classroom, and the badly injured lay in pools of blood amid the debris and rubble caused by the blast. “I was shaking,” he said. “It was very, very hard for me to see the blood and hear the children crying.”
By daylight, the detritus of people’s lives was visible among ruins of the classroom: a ball, a bucket, some blankets, tins of food, a pair of flip-flops. The corpses of donkeys, used to haul the meagre possessions of refugees to what they thought was safety, lay at the school’s entrance as two lads wearing Palestinian boy scout scarves collected human body parts for burial. Five of the injured were in a critical condition in hospital.
  A Palestinian collects body parts in a classroom at the Abu Hussein UN school. Photograph: Lefteris Pitarakis/AP  
Halabi was facing impossible requests for advice from those who escaped the carnage. “These people are very angry. They evacuated their homes and came here for protection, not to be killed inside a UN shelter. Now they are asking me whether to stay or leave. They are very frightened. They don’t know what to do.”
The attack on the school was the sixth time that UNRWA premises have been hit since the war in Gaza began more than three weeks ago, the UN said.
Palestinians fled their homes after Israel warned that failure to do so would put their lives at risk. Those at the Jabaliya school were among more than 200,000 who have sought shelter at UN premises in the belief that families would be safe.
Analysis of evidence gathered at the site by UNRWA led to an initial assessment that Israeli artillery had hit the school, causing “multiple civilian deaths and injuries including of women and children and the UNRWA guard who was trying to protect the site. These are people who were instructed to leave their homes by the Israeli army.”
Krähenbühl added: “Our staff, the very people leading the humanitarian response, are being killed. Our shelters are overflowing. Tens of thousands may soon be stranded in the streets of Gaza, without food, water and shelter if attacks on these areas continue.”
The Israel Defence Forces (IDF) said it was investigating the incident at the UN school. Initial inquiries showed that “Hamas militants fired mortar shells from the vicinity of the school, and [Israeli] soldiers responded by firing towards the origins of the fire”, a spokeswoman said.
A UN source said there was no evidence of militant activity inside the school.
The US, which has been at odds with Israel’s prime minister, Binyamin Netanyahu, over efforts to secure a ceasefire, condemned the school shelling but did not specifically blame Israel.
The incident comes after an explosion at another UN school in Beit Hanoun last week as the playground was filled with families awaiting evacuation. Israel denied responsibility for the deaths, saying a single “errant” shell fired by its forces hit the school playground, which was empty at the time.
  A damaged classroom of the school. Photograph: Mohammed Saber/EPA  
UNRWA has rejected the IDF’s account, saying an initial shell was followed by several others within minutes. Reporters who visited the school shortly afterwards said damage and debris was consistent with mortar rounds. UNRWA has found rockets at three of its schools in Gaza in the past three weeks, which it has swiftly condemned as “flagrant violation[s] of the neutrality of our premises”.
Israel says militants from Hamas and other organisations launch rockets from the vicinity of UNRWA properties.
The Israeli military said it had targeted more than 4,100 sites in Gaza since the start of the conflict on 8 July. The death toll in Gaza rose above 1,300 on Wednesday.
Three soldiers were killed in fighting around Khan Younis, bringing the total IDF death toll to 56. Three civilians have died in rocket attacks on Israel.
In an emotional statement, the Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, said the “destructive cycle of violence has caused untold suffering”.
He said: “You can’t look at the pictures coming from Gaza and Israel without your heart breaking. We must cry to God and beat down the doors of heaven and pray for peace and justice and security. Only a costly and open-hearted seeking of peace between Israeli and Palestinian can protect innocent people, their children and grandchildren, from ever worse violence.”
He called for a renewed “commitment to political dialogue in the wider search for peace and security for both Israeli and Palestinians”.
Support for the military operation among the Israeli public remained solid. A poll published by Tel Aviv university this week found 95% of Israeli Jews felt the offensive was justified. Only 4% believed too much force had been used.
SOURCE: http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/jul/30/world-disgrace-gaza-un-shelter-school-israel

    thenearsightedmonkey:

    'World stands disgraced' as Israeli shelling of school kills at least 15

    • UN condemns IDF attack on sleeping children as violation of international law
    • Strike on crowded market in Shujai’iya during ceasefire kills 17 
    • Death toll now more than 1,300 after three weeks of fighting
    Link to video: Gaza: nothing more shameful than attacking sleeping children, says Ban Ki-moon

    United Nations officials described the killing of sleeping children as a disgrace to the world and accused Israel of a serious violation of international law after a school in Gaza being used to shelter Palestinian families was shelled on Wednesday.

    At least 15 people, mostly children and women, died when the school in Jabaliya refugee camp was hit by five shells during a night of relentless bombardment across Gaza. More than 100 people were injured.

    Ban Ki-moon, the UN secretary general, said the attack was “outrageous and unjustifiable” and demanded “accountability and justice”. The UN said its officials had repeatedly given details of the school and its refugee population to Israel.

    A Palestinian girl 220 cries while receiving treatment for her injuries caused by an Israeli strike. A Palestinian girl cries while receiving treatment for her injuries caused by an Israeli strike. Photograph: Khalil Hamra/AP

    Fighting in Gaza continued through the day despite a four-hour humanitarian ceasefire called by Israel from 3pm. A crowded market in Shujai’iya was hit in the late afternoon, causing at least 17 deaths, including a journalist, and injuring about 200 people, according to Gaza health officials. They said people had ventured out to shop in the belief a ceasefire was in place. Witnesses said several shells struck as people were running away. Israel said rockets and mortar shells continued to be fired from Gaza.

    At the UN school the first shell came just after the early morning call to prayer, when most of those taking shelter were asleep, crammed into classrooms with what few possessions they had managed to snatch as they fled their homes.

    About 3,300 people had squashed into Jabaliya Elementary A&B Girls’ School since the Israeli military warned people to leave their homes and neighbourhoods or risk death under intense bombardment. Classroom number one, near the school’s entrance, had become home to about 40 people, mostly women and children.

    As a shell blasted through the wall, showering occupants with shrapnel and spattering blood on walls and floors, Amna Zantit, 31, scrambled to gather up her three terrified infants in a panicked bid for the relative safety of the schoolyard. “Everyone was trying to escape,” she said, clutching her eight-month old baby tightly. Minutes later, a second shell slammed through the roof of the two-storey school. At least 15 people were killed and more than 100 injured. Most were women or children.

    Pierre Krähenbühl, commissioner-general of the UN agency for Palestinian refugees, UNRWA, said the shelling of the school was a “serious violation of international law by Israeli forces”.

    Krähenbühl said: “Last night, children were killed as they slept next to their parents on the floor of a classroom in a UN-designated shelter in Gaza. Children killed in their sleep; this is an affront to all of us, a source of universal shame. Today the world stands disgraced.”

    Khalil al-Halabi, the UN official in charge of the schools in the area, was quickly on the scene. Bodies were littered over the classroom, and the badly injured lay in pools of blood amid the debris and rubble caused by the blast. “I was shaking,” he said. “It was very, very hard for me to see the blood and hear the children crying.”

    By daylight, the detritus of people’s lives was visible among ruins of the classroom: a ball, a bucket, some blankets, tins of food, a pair of flip-flops. The corpses of donkeys, used to haul the meagre possessions of refugees to what they thought was safety, lay at the school’s entrance as two lads wearing Palestinian boy scout scarves collected human body parts for burial. Five of the injured were in a critical condition in hospital.

    A palestinian collects body parts in a classroom at the Abu Hussein UN school. A Palestinian collects body parts in a classroom at the Abu Hussein UN school. Photograph: Lefteris Pitarakis/AP

    Halabi was facing impossible requests for advice from those who escaped the carnage. “These people are very angry. They evacuated their homes and came here for protection, not to be killed inside a UN shelter. Now they are asking me whether to stay or leave. They are very frightened. They don’t know what to do.”

    The attack on the school was the sixth time that UNRWA premises have been hit since the war in Gaza began more than three weeks ago, the UN said.

    Palestinians fled their homes after Israel warned that failure to do so would put their lives at risk. Those at the Jabaliya school were among more than 200,000 who have sought shelter at UN premises in the belief that families would be safe.

    Analysis of evidence gathered at the site by UNRWA led to an initial assessment that Israeli artillery had hit the school, causing “multiple civilian deaths and injuries including of women and children and the UNRWA guard who was trying to protect the site. These are people who were instructed to leave their homes by the Israeli army.”

    Krähenbühl added: “Our staff, the very people leading the humanitarian response, are being killed. Our shelters are overflowing. Tens of thousands may soon be stranded in the streets of Gaza, without food, water and shelter if attacks on these areas continue.”

    The Israel Defence Forces (IDF) said it was investigating the incident at the UN school. Initial inquiries showed that “Hamas militants fired mortar shells from the vicinity of the school, and [Israeli] soldiers responded by firing towards the origins of the fire”, a spokeswoman said.

    A UN source said there was no evidence of militant activity inside the school.

    The US, which has been at odds with Israel’s prime minister, Binyamin Netanyahu, over efforts to secure a ceasefire, condemned the school shelling but did not specifically blame Israel.

    The incident comes after an explosion at another UN school in Beit Hanoun last week as the playground was filled with families awaiting evacuation. Israel denied responsibility for the deaths, saying a single “errant” shell fired by its forces hit the school playground, which was empty at the time.

    Palestinians inspect a damaged classroom of the UN school in Jabalia, northern Gaza, 30 July 2014. A damaged classroom of the school. Photograph: Mohammed Saber/EPA

    UNRWA has rejected the IDF’s account, saying an initial shell was followed by several others within minutes. Reporters who visited the school shortly afterwards said damage and debris was consistent with mortar rounds. UNRWA has found rockets at three of its schools in Gaza in the past three weeks, which it has swiftly condemned as “flagrant violation[s] of the neutrality of our premises”.

    Israel says militants from Hamas and other organisations launch rockets from the vicinity of UNRWA properties.

    The Israeli military said it had targeted more than 4,100 sites in Gaza since the start of the conflict on 8 July. The death toll in Gaza rose above 1,300 on Wednesday.

    Three soldiers were killed in fighting around Khan Younis, bringing the total IDF death toll to 56. Three civilians have died in rocket attacks on Israel.

    In an emotional statement, the Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, said the “destructive cycle of violence has caused untold suffering”.

    He said: “You can’t look at the pictures coming from Gaza and Israel without your heart breaking. We must cry to God and beat down the doors of heaven and pray for peace and justice and security. Only a costly and open-hearted seeking of peace between Israeli and Palestinian can protect innocent people, their children and grandchildren, from ever worse violence.”

    He called for a renewed “commitment to political dialogue in the wider search for peace and security for both Israeli and Palestinians”.

    Support for the military operation among the Israeli public remained solid. A poll published by Tel Aviv university this week found 95% of Israeli Jews felt the offensive was justified. Only 4% believed too much force had been used.

    SOURCE: http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/jul/30/world-disgrace-gaza-un-shelter-school-israel

     
  7. 22:18

    Notes: 33

    Reblogged from azspot

    …over the past two years, there have been virtually no rockets coming out of Gaza, and Israel continued to siege Gaza and blockade Gaza. And that siege is a form of slow death. People are saying we can either die quickly now, or we die slowly through the siege and the blockade. If I’m a father and I cannot get a life-saving medicine for my kid because of that siege, how am I going to feel? What am I going to do? There were no rockets before 2001; Israel continued to occupy Gaza. There were no rockets in the ’90s and the ’80s; Israel continued to occupy Gaza and kill Palestinians.
     
  8. 22:15

    Notes: 136

    Reblogged from cultureofresistance

    image: Download

     
  9. 19:45 29th Jul 2014

    Notes: 185

    Reblogged from deleuzenotes

    The question is not: is it true? But: does it work? What new thoughts does it make it possible to think? What new emotions does it make it possible to feel? What new sensations and perceptions does it open in the body?
    — Brian Massumi, Foreword to A Thousand Plateaus  (via antineutral)

    (Source: rhizombie)

     
  10. Perhaps ‘weeping’ is too crude; perhaps we must not refer all tears to one and the same signification; perhaps within the same lover there are several subjects who engage in neighboring but different modes of ‘weeping’. Which is the ‘I’ who has ‘tears in my eyes’? Which is that other self who, on a certain day, was ‘on the verge of tears’? Who am I who pours out ‘all the tears in my body’? or who sheds, upon waking, ‘a torrent of tears’?
    — Roland Barthes, A Lover’s Discourse (via mayhap)
     
  11. Much of what is labeled psychiatric disease is grief that has never been expressed or properly felt, or validated. If we have unexplored trauma, then it’s likely we have unexplored grief too. Some of us need to begin a grieving process that never started in order to heal. Some of us have a life-time of grief that needs to be allowed and experienced. We can choose to challenge our culture’s fear of grief and the dark emotions and begin to heal and turn it around.


    Grief is subversive, undermining the quiet agreement to behave and be in control of our emotions. It is an act of protest that declares our refusal to live numb and small. There is something feral about grief, something essentially outside the ordained and sanctioned behaviors of our culture. Because of that, grief is necessary to the vitality of the soul. Contrary to our fears, grief is suffused with life-force. It is riddled with energy, an acknowledgment of the erotic coupling with another soul, whether human, animal, plant or ecosystem. It is not a state of deadness or emotional flatness. Grief is alive, wild, untamed and cannot be domesticated. It resists the demands to remain passive and still. We move in jangled, unsettled and riotous ways when grief takes hold of us. It is truly an emotion that rises from soul. – by Francis Weller, from Entering the Healing Ground: Grief, Ritual and the Soul of the World


    Grief, like all the other difficult and/or dark emotions often gets pathologized, but it is an important part of life, without which we would not be human. Grief need not be pathologized even if it takes a long time.

    — Monica Cassani, Grief is subversive (via madness-narrative)
     
  12. There is a disjunction between speaking and seeing, between the visible and the articulable: ‘what we see never lies in what we say’, and vice versa. The conjunction is impossible for two reasons: the statement has its own correlative object and is not a proposition designating a state of things or a visible object, as logic would have it; but neither is the visible a mute meaning, a signified of power to be realized in language, as phenomenology would have it.
    — Gilles DeLeuze, Foucault, New York: Continuum, p 55.
     
  13. 03:22

    Notes: 10

    Reblogged from azspot

    What we’re calling the “border crisis” is today’s Children’s March in the struggle for immigrant justice. The real question is not how to “address the crisis” but rather what the faces of these children demand of us as a country?
     
  14. This whole range of questions on every occasion constitutes the problem of truth. The Use of Pleasure will draw out the conclusions of all the earlier books when it shows that truth offers itself to knowledge only through a series of ‘problematizations’ and that these problematizations are created only on teh basis of ‘practices’, practices of seeing and speaking. These practices, the process and the method, constitute the procedures for truth, ‘a history of truth’. But these two halves of truth must enter into a relation, problematically, at the very moment when the problem of truth denies any possible correspondence or conformity between them… .
    Many people are in the asylum who ought not to be there, but many are also not there who ought to be: psychiatry in the nineteenth century is built on this observation which, far from forming a solid univocal concept of madness, ‘problematizes’ it.
    — Gilles DeLeuze, Foucault, New York: Continuum, p 54.
     
  15. (photo credit: 1boringoldman)
Mickey Nardo on NIMH Funding for Antidepressant Research

TMAP was a scam; STAR*D was a bust; IMPACTS never even got off the ground. CO-MED flat-lined. Can EMBARC live up to that record? [I warned you I couldn’t contain the sarcasm]. It’s stories like this that account for my negativity about Dr. Insel’s NIMH. These people have been funded for a series of ill-conceived, badly designed, and poorly executed studies one after another for a decade and a half to the tune of $50 M. There’s just no need for that. STAR*D produced hundreds of forgettable papers, but never even really reported on what the study proposed to find out. Insel’s NIMH famously selects the directions for research rather than selecting from among the creativity of researchers own proposals. They chase things like personalized medicine, algorithmic medicine, measurement based medicine, translational medicine, RDoC, etc. – fads that come and go – and genomics, proteonomics, neuroimaging, connectomics – shiny objects that have appeared in view. And the same people get funded over and over, like the examples mentioned above, independent of their track records.

These attempts to turn clinical psychiatry into algorithms for medications driven by symptoms, often gathered by questionnaires, have yielded nothing. Worse, they trivialize both the human experience of patients and the practitioners’ efforts to help them. Let’s hope that the chart up there has finally run out of iterations and we can retire the side…

    (photo credit: 1boringoldman)

    Mickey Nardo on NIMH Funding for Antidepressant Research

    TMAP was a scam; STAR*D was a bust; IMPACTS never even got off the ground. CO-MED flat-lined. Can EMBARC live up to that record? [I warned you I couldn’t contain the sarcasm]. It’s stories like this that account for my negativity about Dr. Insel’s NIMH. These people have been funded for a series of ill-conceived, badly designed, and poorly executed studies one after another for a decade and a half to the tune of $50 M. There’s just no need for that. STAR*D produced hundreds of forgettable papers, but never even really reported on what the study proposed to find out. Insel’s NIMH famously selects the directions for research rather than selecting from among the creativity of researchers own proposals. They chase things like personalized medicine, algorithmic medicine, measurement based medicine, translational medicine, RDoC, etc. – fads that come and goand genomics, proteonomics, neuroimaging, connectomics – shiny objects that have appeared in view. And the same people get funded over and over, like the examples mentioned above, independent of their track records.

    These attempts to turn clinical psychiatry into algorithms for medications driven by symptoms, often gathered by questionnaires, have yielded nothing. Worse, they trivialize both the human experience of patients and the practitioners’ efforts to help them. Let’s hope that the chart up there has finally run out of iterations and we can retire the side…