1. image: Download

    (Source: lmfaosmh)

     
  2. shrinkrants:

    I think this long blog post by Neurocritic is the best overview I’ve found of what’s going on among the various groups who find things to question and criticize about Psychiatry these days (even though he does leave out Mindfreedom, a patient’s rights group I support). From the intro:

    "The ability to label and categorize something (or someone) implies a certain degree of power and mastery over them. In the domain of psychiatry, several groups or movements have rebelled against not only labels, but against current treatments designed to "normalize" the problematic thoughts and behaviors. Below is my non-expert attempt to understand a few of these groups, which (by necessity) requires an effort to label them."

     
  3. image: Download

     
  4. medicalstate:

    A Woman’s Life by Stonehouse.

    A preceptor once told me the greatest joy of his profession was watching his patients grow. Some of them he encountered later in their life. Those whom he had the opportunity to be involved with from the very beginning however hold a special place for him. It is the good times and the bad times, the times when the first tooth erupts or the first day they walk, and the times when they first go to school or graduate from college.

    That is the special privilege we have to be involved in people’s lives.

     
  5. "It has at times been assumed that externalizing conversations are complicit with a trend toward constructing people as autonomous units of thought and action. It is my hope that I have given sufficient illustration of the practices of externalizing conversations to dispel this assumption. these practices make it possible for people not only to redefine their relationship with the problems of their lives, but also to redefine their relationships with each other in ways that acknowledge each other’s voices in the development of their sense of identity. This type of redefinition fosters a more relational sense of identity."
 - Michael White, Maps of Narrative Practice, p 59.

    "It has at times been assumed that externalizing conversations are complicit with a trend toward constructing people as autonomous units of thought and action. It is my hope that I have given sufficient illustration of the practices of externalizing conversations to dispel this assumption. these practices make it possible for people not only to redefine their relationship with the problems of their lives, but also to redefine their relationships with each other in ways that acknowledge each other’s voices in the development of their sense of identity. This type of redefinition fosters a more relational sense of identity."

     - Michael White, Maps of Narrative Practice, p 59.

     
  6. Narratives are inevitably moralistic; they are never created spontaneously from “the facts” but are rather stories imposed upon a range of phenomena that always include implicit ideas about what’s right and what’s wrong. The proponents of the Industrial Revolution inherited from the philosophers of the Enlightenment the narrative of human (read: European) progress over time but placed technological advancement and economic liberalization at the center of their conception of progress. This narrative remains today an ingrained operating principle that propels us in a seemingly unstoppable way toward more growth and more technology, because the assumption is that these things are ultimately beneficial for humanity.
    — 

    Jeremy  Caradonna in The Atlantic. Is ‘Progress’ Good for Humanity?

    Rethinking the narrative of economic development, with sustainability in mind

    (via protoslacker)

     
  7. The form of inquiry that is employed during externalizing conversations can be likened to investigative reporting. The primary goal of investigative reporting is to develop an exposé on the corruption associated with abuses of power and privilege. Although investigative reporters are not politically neutral, the activities of their inquiry do not take them into the domains of problem-solving, of enacting reform, or of engaging in direct power struggles with those who might be perpetuating abuses of power and privilege. Investigative reporters are not usually “hotly” engaged wight he subjects of their investigations. Rather, their actions usually reflect a relatively “cool” engagement.

    In response to the investigative questions posed by the therapist, the people in therapy also assume an investigative-reporter-like position. In this way they contribute to building an exposé of the character of the problem, its operations and activities, and the purposes that inform these operations and activities.

    — White, Michael (2007). Maps of Narrative Practice. New York: Norton. pp 27 & 28.
     
  8. b-case:

"to many of these people, articulate as they were, the great loss was the loss of language—that they could not say what was in them to say. you have some subtle thought and it comes out like a piece of broken bottle. they could of course, manage to communicate, but just to communicate was frustrating. as karl otto alp, the ex-film star who became a buyer for macy’s, put it years later, ‘i felt like a child, or worse, often like a moron. i am left with myself unexpressed. what i know, indeed, what i am, becomes to me a burden. my tongue hangs useless.’ the same with oskar it figures. there was a terrible sense of useless tongue, and i think the reason for his trouble with his other tutors was that to keep from drowning in things unsaid he wanted to swallow the ocean in a gulp: today he would learn english and tomorrow wow them with an impeccable fourth of july speech, followed by a successful lecture at the institute for public studies."

    b-case:

    "to many of these people, articulate as they were, the great loss was the loss of language—that they could not say what was in them to say. you have some subtle thought and it comes out like a piece of broken bottle. they could of course, manage to communicate, but just to communicate was frustrating. as karl otto alp, the ex-film star who became a buyer for macy’s, put it years later, ‘i felt like a child, or worse, often like a moron. i am left with myself unexpressed. what i know, indeed, what i am, becomes to me a burden. my tongue hangs useless.’ the same with oskar it figures. there was a terrible sense of useless tongue, and i think the reason for his trouble with his other tutors was that to keep from drowning in things unsaid he wanted to swallow the ocean in a gulp: today he would learn english and tomorrow wow them with an impeccable fourth of july speech, followed by a successful lecture at the institute for public studies."

     
  9. image: Download

    kateoplis:

Adjuncts Professors make up 76.4% of all US faculty, and the majority live below the poverty line.
Mary-Faith Cerasoli, above, is “sleeping in her car, showering at college athletic centers and applying for food stamps.” 
“They call us professors, but they’re paying us at poverty levels…I just want to make a living from a skill I’ve spent 30 years developing.”
“Students aren’t getting what they pay for or, if they are, it is because adjuncts themselves are subsidizing their education.”
The Adjunct Revolt | Atlantic

    kateoplis:

    Adjuncts Professors make up 76.4% of all US faculty, and the majority live below the poverty line.

    Mary-Faith Cerasoli, above, is “sleeping in her car, showering at college athletic centers and applying for food stamps.” 

    They call us professors, but they’re paying us at poverty levels…I just want to make a living from a skill I’ve spent 30 years developing.”

    “Students aren’t getting what they pay for or, if they are, it is because adjuncts themselves are subsidizing their education.

    The Adjunct Revolt | Atlantic

     
  10. I love getting to know people, taking time to hear their stories. I can get the best kind of lost in another person’s story. My career has come back again and again to sharpening my skills at listening constructively to people’s stories. This takes time. this is not business as usual, or any kind of business. It is not diagnosis. A corporate medical setting makes it very easy to get swept up in other currents. How can I claim time and energy, and interest others in joining me, to linger in the pools outside the rapids?

     
  11. 21:15 18th Sep 2014

    Notes: 170

    Reblogged from azspot

    [Adam] Smith wanted free public education, state financed infrastructure and health measures, the breaking up of monopolies and other reforms that would ease the way for bright sons of the peasantry to compete with the sons of owner-lords. The very first acts of the American Founders, after the Revolution, included seizure of half the land in the former colonies from a few lordly families and redistribution, in order to create a (somewhat more) level playing field. Indeed, many of the reform movements since then have revolved around spreading that circle of fairness. Not just because it’s nice, but because it is stupid to waste talent and let cheaters stifle competition by the maximum number. In other words, it takes some socialism to deliver the world that Hayek recommended!
    — CONTRARY BRIN (via azspot)
     
  12. The less you eat, drink and buy books; the less you go to the theatre, the dance hall, the public house; the less you think, love, theorise, sing, paint, fence, etc., the more you save – the greater becomes your treasure which neither moths nor rust will devour – your capital. The less you are, the less you express your own life, the more you have, i.e., the greater is your alienated life, the greater is the store of your estranged being.
     
  13. thenewinquiry:

    Imagine the dying patient today: sitting in the intensive care unit, hooked up to a ventilator that artificially pumps their heart and a feeding tube because they can no longer eat on their own. The patient could be on several drugs or antibiotics, hooked up to devices that keep an eye on every bodily function, or even need hemodialysis because their kidneys have failed. All the while physicians scramble about doing everything in their power to keep this patient alive as long as they possibly can, even when they know that time is limited. Why? Because this person is a patient in a hospital and everyone knows you go to hospitals to get better, not to die.

    Lydia Dugdale gives such a description in her Hasting’s Center Report article “The Art of Dying Well.” Dugdale claims that American society is ill equipped for the experience of dying. Instead a physician’s focus is solely on perpetuating life as long as possible, and the family often times desires the same thing. According to Dugdale, today’s focus on continued life doesn’t make dying any better than in the mid-fourteenth century in Europe during the Bubonic plague epidemic. Then, the constant presence of death turned society’s attention to ensuring that the dying would receive a good death.

    Read More

     
  14. In short, physics has discovered
    that there are no solids,
    no continuous surfaces,
    no straight lines;
    only waves,
    no things
    only energy event complexes,
    only behaviors,
    only verbs,
    only relationships.
    — R. Buckminster Fuller (via ecohouses)
     
  15. "Who hasn’t heard of Paxil Study 329? It’s the gold standard for everything that’s been wrong in the psychiatric-industrial complex: ghost-writing, jury-rigged data, distorted reporting of adverse events, guest authorship, inflated efficacy, the list never ends. It’s the subject of a captivating book [Side Effects: A Prosecutor, a Whistleblower, and a Bestselling Antidepressant on Trial], televised investigations, civil suits, federal suits, blog posts too numerous to count [this is my 50th post mentioning it], and calls for retraction from just about everyone to just about everyone involved.”

    Every time I read about this study and everything it represents, it get enraged all over again. What does it take for enough of us to speak and act with enough volume and determination to make a difference? Personally, I know that just showing up and doing my daily job for a corporate, “non-profit,” ever-growing hospital-based healthcare system implicates me in business-as-usual. I look for chances to speak up about issues like those study 329 represents, but I also prescribe antidepressants (for severe depression in adults who are informed about the possible bad effects, but not to adolescents). I’m heartened to know that people like Mickey are out there. Linking with him thru his blog is a conscious act of solidarity, as is publishing this link to his post on this issue. I’m looking for other daily practices to help myself and others link up in supporting good science over scientism, person-centered care over capital-centered care, and quality over quantity.